Your next consideration should be where you want your tattoo. Is it something you want to show off, easily conceal or reveal, or a more personal project that only you will see? Your body will be your canvas, so it’s important to choose a portion of your anatomy appropriate to your art. Back pieces are exceptionally well suited to larger concepts, which you may want to expand at some future date. If you just want to start small, the bicep or the forearm are ideal for more contained show pieces, discrete emblems that can be worked into “sleeves”—either half or full—at a later time.
You must also consider the cleanliness of the parlor itself. If your tattoo artist does not, or refuses to, wear gloves, then this doesn’t equate to a clean tattooing experience, and this can be highly risky. The tattoo artist should also follow the basic rules when it comes to cleanliness. First, they must place a barrier over every surface or subject which could possibly come into direct contact with the tattoo itself, or with their hands. Everything they use must be disposable – The artist should cover their wash bottles, machines, tattooing area, and clip cords with bags. The ink and needles must be disposed too. The tubes used for tattooing should be sterilized regularly in a medical-grade autoclave.
One small Greek study showed that the R20 method—four passes with the laser, twenty minutes apart—caused more breaking up of the ink than the conventional method without more scarring or adverse effects. However, this study was performed on a very small patient population (12 patients total), using the weakest of the QS lasers, the 755 nm Alexandrite laser. One of the other main problems with this study was the fact that more than half of the 18 tattoos removed were not professional and amateur tattoos are always easier to remove. Proof of concept studies are underway, but many laser experts advise against the R20 method using the more modern and powerful tattoo removal lasers available at most offices as an increase in adverse side effects including scarring and dischromia is likely. Patients should inquire about the laser being used if the R20 treatment method is offered by a facility as it is usually only offered by clinics that are using the weak 755 nm Alexandrite as opposed to the more powerful and versatile devices that are more commonly used. Moreover, dermatologists offering the R20 method should inform patients that it just one alternative to proven protocols and is not a gold standard treatment method to remove tattoos.
Alternatively, you may have had a bad reaction to the tattoo and want it taken off. In this case, says Dr. Bard, "the worst thing you can do is laser tattoo removal. [Laser removal will] to break up the pigment and bring it into the lymph nodes, which will cause a systemic reaction everywhere.” A systemic reaction puts a patient at risk for anaphylaxis, which is life threatening. Alternative removal methods for people with allergies include surgically cutting the tattoo out or removing it with an abrasive laser, which removes the top layer of skin.
Tattoos are meant to be permanent. Artists create tattoos by using an electrically powered machine that moves a needle up and down to inject ink into the skin, penetrating the epidermis, or outer layer, and depositing a drop of ink into the dermis, the second layer of skin. The cells of the dermis are more stable compared with those of the epidermis, so the ink will mostly stay in place for a person’s lifetime.
Studies of various tattoo pigments have shown that a number of pigments (most containing iron oxide or titanium dioxide) change color when irradiated with Q-switched laser energy. Some tattoo colors including flesh tones, light red, white, peach and light brown containing pigments as well as some green and blue tattoo pigments, changed to black when irradiated with Q-switched laser pulses. The resulting gray-black color may require more treatments to remove. If tattoo darkening does occur, after 8 weeks the newly darkened tattoo can be treated as if it were black pigment.[50]

Of course, geometric tattoos branch into the realms of sacred geometry, tribal history, and deep personal significance, so it's always worth doing some research before committing to a lifetime of ink, and the commentaries that accompany it. Personally, I'm of the opinion that whenever possible, it's best to have a custom piece designed for you, or to design your own work, if you're comfortable doing so (with the aid of your tattoo artist, if they're willing to help, because they're aware of what will and won't work on certain areas of the body, as well as what they're capable of creating at a professional level). Coming in with expectations to copy or rip off another artist's design will more than likely upset your tattoo artist, which you definitely want to avoid. Because like most professionals, your tattoo artist has integrity, and likely holds herself/himself to a very high standard — which usually includes respect for their work, and the work of other industry professionals.


Experimental observations of the effects of short-pulsed lasers on tattoos were first reported in the late 1960s by Leon Goldman and others.[22][23][24] In 1979 an argon laser was used for tattoo removal in 28 patients, with limited success. In 1978 a carbon dioxide laser was also used, but because it targeted water, a chromophore present in all cells, this type of laser generally caused scarring after treatments.[25][3][26][2]
Nature is full of geometry, and spirituality has always been fascinated by this hidden secret. Sacred geometry is used in religious architecture (and for all religions), with concepts observed in natural patterns, as well as in art. With the growth of dotwork, aka pointillism tattoos, geometric tattoos has soon moved from meaningless ornamental tattoos to masterpieces with deeper meanings. Ink lovers getting sacred geometry tattoos are following the traditions of holistic practice, when shamans and monks were the only ones tattooing. Depending on their placement and design, they believe that their tattoos could affect their health, spirituality and energy.
We’ll start with this ghost design. In recent years there has been more of a movement towards smaller, minimalist style tattoos, rather than the traditional ink heavy ones. It also shows that girls are not limited to only getting ‘girly tattoos’. The cartoon ghost is a fun, whilst not been too spooky. Smaller tattoos are also becoming more popular nowadays as they are more affordable and often people can get a few smaller tattoos for the same cost as a bigger one. Not to mention they are also a lot easier to hide/conceal should you need to for work.
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