Regardless, if you are going to start with a single tattoo, in any location, be sure to tell your artist that your eventual end goal is a full sleeve. “She or he can leave the piece in a way that it can be added to in time,” Gualteros says. “Basically, to get the best result for this, you should ask for flow.” (That’s tattoo-artist speak for “something that will flow nicely with other designs”.)
Generally speaking, geometric tattoos tend to draw from shapes and patterns in the natural world. Some symbols, like the ones above, are associated with deeper religious and cultural backgrounds. Among the basic shapes, circles can portray relationships and community, and square-based designs stand for stability. Combining or connecting them is a way to convey balance between the two. More intricate figures, such as a dodecahedron (three-dimensional shape with 12 plane faces) or icosahedron (with 20 plane faces) may show the juxtaposition of complexity and unity.
Another ancient symbol drawn in geometric tattoos is the Gordian knot. Based on a Greek myth, the knot was used to secure the ox-cart of Gordias, a peasant farmer prophesied to be king. No one could untie the knot until Alexander the Great finally cut it with his sword after also failing in his attempts. The Gordian knot thus became a metaphor for a complicated problem that must be solved by thinking outside the box. While there are no pictures of the actual Gordian knot, it is commonly depicted as three or more interlocking rings. As a tattoo, it can represent the complexity of life, and the appreciation for the beauty in its unsolvable mysteries.
The amount of time to get a full sleeve tattoo on your arm is completely subjective. The entire process, similar to the outcome itself, is highly subjective to plenty of variables. Factors that you must think about include the speed of the artist, the design, as well as your personal healing time. The main factor involved in how long will you be sitting on that tattoo chair is the complexity of the concept. Full sleeves that feature your traditional sailor-style tattoo artwork might take as little as 10 to 15 hours. Meanwhile, a photorealistic tattoo can take at least eighty hours to complete – Possibly even more.

To help you, at least a little, we got some design suggestions from Sean Dowdell, co-owner of Club Tattoo, which has locations in Las Vegas, as well as Mesa, Tempe, and Scottsdale, AZ. Dowdell's team has inked celebs like Slash, Miley Cyrus, Amar’e Stoudemire, Blake Shelton, Steve Aoki, and Keith Sweat. We asked him for suggestions on the most popular types of tattoos today—and ones that will look good with time, instead of feeling dated to a certain decade.
“The big misconception with tattoo removal is that it’s an eraser,” Sherrif F. Ibrahim, M.D.,, an associate professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Rochester, tells SELF. But it’s not that simple. “It’s a process,” he says. Sometimes, complete removal of a tattoo can take one or two years, with treatments occurring every 6, 8, or 12 weeks. Plus, it’s not like getting your eyebrows waxed—it’s an invasive procedure that costs hundreds of dollars a session. Lasers remove tattoos by blowing up pigment molecules into tiny pieces, which are then cleared away by an immune system response. Healing from laser treatment isn’t always a walk in the park, either. “The laser breaks the skin’s surface, so you have bleeding, you have swelling, and you have pain after the treatment,” says Dr. Ibrahim.
My sleeve took three sessions of nine hours each and felt like what it was: a needle loaded with ink jamming into my skin at high speed. It vibrates exhilaratingly through your bones, zings into the flesh, numbs you out, exhausts you later, sweats blood, swells up. A one-inch tattoo across the nervy, fatty pad at the bottom of my spine hurt a million times more than the sleeve.
Older generations often disapprove this kind of self expression, based on the fact that in old times, only the prisoners used to have tattoos. But time changes and nowadays men like this kind of art and use it to underline the most attractive parts of their body or for personal reasons. They leave like a mark, a memory carrying it through their whole lives.
Kitchen & DiningBakeware,Coffee, Tea, & Espresso,Cookboo...30471 LuggageBackpacks,Briefcases & Laptop Bags,Carry...6232 Mattresses & AccessoriesMattress Toppers & Pads,Mattresses524 Office & School SuppliesDesk Accessories,Home Office Furniture,N...21002 Outdoor DécorDoormats, Flags & Wind Chimes,Lighting,P...17853 Patio & GardenBird Feeders & Food,Fire Pits & Outdoor...29295 Seasonal DécorChristmas,Easter,General Seasons,Hallowe...14705 Storage & OrganizationBathroom Storage,Closet Storage,Entryway...14676
Full Sleeve Warrior Tattoos – The warrior full sleeve design may present the pictures of warriors and weapons, engaged in conflicts and wars. Such a tattoo design reflects sheer power and strength. Other designs may include elements such as hearts, dreamcatchers, feathers, arrow, and skulls. Clock, compass, geometric, anchor, musical symbols and angels are some other common things used in such a design. One can have as many of them included in tattoo sleeves design as he wants, but it has to be discussed with the designers, right from the beginning stages of the tattoo, so that he can plan the design accordingly.

Plenty of cultures from across the globe have used tattoos as a form of expression. Certain cultures have used tattoos as a part of many rites of passage, for beauty, or artistic purposes, as a type of warrior mark, to identify a tribe or a gang, and so on. But it’s pretty much clear that when it comes to cultures from across the globe, tattoos have always stood for both belonging and marginality.
Ouroborus Geometric Art – Just like the mandalas, Ouroborus is another commonly used element in geometrical tattoo designs, as it has a special meaning. In Greek mythology, it signifies a dragon or serpent which devours its own tail and in symbolism, the shape stands for self reflexivity of a person in the circle of life and death. The ouroborus can also be featured as a double one, with two serpents drawn joining each other’s opposite ends and the design is considered as a symbol of volatility. It is also compared with the opposite yet complimentary energies of yin and yang.
Compasses were traditionally tattooed on sailors and boating enthusiasts. They symbolise not only been at sea but also finding direction in your life or a particular journey you embarked on. Nowadays they are popular for aesthetic value as well as for people such as backpackers who have done a lot of traveling and want a compass design. Some will even have the compass face the direction of their home from where they have moved to so as to have a reminder of where they came from.
×

What Are you Looking for?

Ideas and Designs Sacred Geometry Tattoo Removal

sacred geometry tattoo
tattoo removal
tattoo ideas sacred geometry tattoo tattoo removal

tattoo sleeves