Tattooing has been around since ancient times, and though many trends in the art of permanent ink have come and gone, there is one particular style that seems to have stood the test of time: geometric tattoos. Featuring simple shapes and precision patterns, these mesmerizing tattoo designs not only look amazing, but may also illustrate sacred, geometric symbols, teeming with deeper hidden meanings.

Regardless, how you try to crack the code, one thing is true: Scared geometry can be found in the molecules of our own DNA. Perhaps that is why we are so fascinated by these timeless geometric codes. What stories do they hold assuming we can unlock them? For now, all we can do is contemplate and gaze deep into the lines of the universe with wonder.
Tattoos have been used by various cultures across the globe as a way of self-expression. Sleeve tattoos are quite popular with men and have a way of enhancing the masculine features of the wearer. Tattoo sleeves basically refer to those tattoo designs that are usually large in size or cover a huge part of your arm or leg when put together. This type of tattoos starts from the shoulder of a person and continues till the down part of the arm displaying a particular theme.

Sadly, the word "permanent" has no resonance when you're 20. Barbed wire effect around the wrist? Hokusai-style wave design resembling the marbling in medium strength Castello cheese? Big black paisleys pieced together like a children's jumbo jigsaw into a faux armour plate? Indigo slashes over smeared blocks of red, purple, pink and green? I have them all. On one tattoo.
Before the development of laser tattoo removal methods, common techniques included dermabrasion, TCA (Trichloroacetic acid, an acid that removes the top layers of skin, reaching as deep as the layer in which the tattoo ink resides), salabrasion (scrubbing the skin with salt), cryosurgery and excision which is sometimes still used along with skin grafts for larger tattoos.[3][1][4] Many other methods for removing tattoos have been suggested historically including the injection or application of tannic acid, lemon juice, garlic and pigeon dung.[5][6]
The term "sleeve" is a reference to the tattoo's size similarity in coverage to a long shirt sleeve on an article of clothing. In this manner, the term is also used as a verb; for example, "getting sleeved" means to have one's entire arm tattooed. The term is also sometimes used in reference to a large leg tattoo that covers a person's leg in a similar manner[citation needed].

After it’s done peeling, you can start your long-term care plan: “Always use sunblock and body lotion,” says Gualteros. “Honestly, if a tattoo is properly done and properly taken care of, it should be good for life, without touch up. So long as there’s good foundation—that is, black and line work—it should look good over time.” If you don’t properly block the skin from the sun’s wear, or condition it daily, the colors will fade over time and will require a touching up. Considering you’ll be working with a full sleeve or more, it’s best to get in the habit of using sunblock and lotion.


Dowdell says that Celtic and tribal tattoos are on the way out (and those similar in design). You might associate them with muscled celebrities and athletes, and recognize them for their ornate patterns or scenery. A Celtic tattoo uses black ink to background crosses, trees, or folkloric animals. A tribal tattoo uses black ink to fill in spiraling, zigzagging arrows and lines, often migrating from the pec onto the shoulder and arm. The tricky thing about tattoos is that you still see the ones that are “out of style”, because they’re permanently on the wearer. So, Dowdell’s point is that he’s doing far fewer of these types anymore, in favor of the aforementioned ones. As seen on: The Rock’s shoulder and arm. (His is technically a Polynesian tattoo, but stylistically in the same vein.)

5. Get ready for needles. Mentally prepare for visits to consist of more than just a quick and easy laser moment. Mine have been taking about 45 minutes because we take before photos, clean the areas, inject them with lidocaine for freezing, laser them, ice them, and then bandage them. Oh, and sometimes a weird thing happens where I taste metal when the laser hits my skin. Dr. Adams says it's a sensation that some people experience when the lidocaine is hit by the laser and [that it] is totally normal…but also, I might be superhuman.


Though laser centers and spas are popping up everywhere, it’s important to make sure laser removal is done by a dermatologist. “[Dermatologists] know what to recognize, how to look for a complication, and who not to treat,” Robert Anolik, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist, tells SELF. With laser tattoo removal, there’s a risk of bleeding, infection, and scarring, all of which can be successfully treated, but only under the proper care of a dermatologist. It’s up to you to check the qualifications of your practitioner. New Jersey is the only state that requires licensed physicians to operate a laser, meaning that in most places, the path to offering laser removal has fewer roadblocks than it should.
Cambodia has a rich history and very ancient temples, it also has beautiful looking characters and words. As such it has become quite popular for people to get tattooed when they travel to Cambodia. It became even more in the last decade since Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie went under the gun with a Khmer style tattoo on her back and since then many have copied this style.
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